• 27Apr

    Using smartphones and health apps to change and manage health behaviours: A population-based survey

    A study, published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, explores how smartphones and health apps are potentially promising tools to change health-related behaviors and manage chronic conditions.

    The aim of this study was to explore (1) the extent of smartphone and health app use, (2) sociodemographic, medical, and behavioral correlates of smartphone and health app use, and (3) associations of the use of apps and app characteristics with actual health behaviors.

    A population-based survey among Germans, aged 35 years and older, was conducted. Sociodemographics, presence of chronic conditions, health behaviors, quality of life, and health literacy, as well as the use of the Internet, smartphone, and health apps were assessed by questionnaire at home visit.

    It was found that 61.25% of participants used a smartphone. Compared with nonusers, smartphone users were younger, did more research on the Internet, were more likely to work full-time and more likely to have a university degree, engaged more in physical activity, and less in low fat diet, and had a higher health-related quality of life and health literacy.

    Among smartphone users, 20.53% used health apps. App users were younger, less likely to be native German speakers, did more research on the Internet, were more likely to report chronic conditions, engaged more in physical activity, and low fat diet, and were more health literate compared with non-users who had a smartphone.

    Health apps focused on smoking cessation (44.5%), healthy diet (38.6%), and weight loss (23.2%). The most common app characteristics were planning (50.7%), reminding (36.1%), prompting motivation (34.4%), and the provision of information (33.6%).

    Significant associations were found between planning and the health behavior physical activity, between feedback or monitoring and physical activity, and between feedback or monitoring and adherence to doctor’s advice.

    http://www.jmir.org/2017/4/e101/

    Using Smartphones and Health Apps to Change and Manage Health Behaviors: A Population-Based Survey