• 28Apr

    Producing targeted information for hard to reach groups (case studies involving collaboration and user involvement) – a voluntary sector approach – Case Study Session: PIF Annual Conference 2016

    At the PIF Annual Conference on Wednesday 25 May 2016 delegates will be able to choose to attend two of six Case Study Sessions on a variety of topics, that have involved partnership working to improve healthcare information and support.

    We will be showcasing each Case Study Session over the next month.  Below is an overview of the Case Study that will be presented by Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust.

    You can find out more details about the conference and how you can attend here:www.pifonline.org.uk/2016-conference

    Producing targeted information for hard to reach groups (case studies involving collaboration and user involvement) – a voluntary sector approach

    In this session, we’ll be thinking about what hard to reach means in the context of health information provision, what challenges are there to produce information for hard to reach groups, and how collaboration can help tackle some of these challenges. In preparation please be ready to discuss your hard to reach groups and any projects you want to share with the group so we can share best practice.

    You will also have a chance to select one of two case studies where collaborative working was used at Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust to ensure the information produced was targeted and accessible. You’ll be asked to vote to select the case study you want to hear more about at the beginning of the session:

    Case study 1. Producing information for low literacy groups – collaborating with focus groups, health professionals and animators.

    Case study 2. Information for people with learning disabilities (LD): a collaborative project with PHE, specialist suppliers and women with LD.

    Presenter biography:

    Claire Cohen – Information and Education Manager, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust 
    Claire manages the Information and Education department at national charity, Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. She joined the Trust in 2009 and prior to joining the charitable sector she was an archaeological scientist.

    She is responsible for the development of the charity’s health information as well as building outreach programmes to raise awareness of cervical cancer and ways to prevent the disease through vaccination and screening. She is part of the senior management team and has a small but perfectly formed department with two full time members of staff in her team.

    Her work always involves demonstrating information need, and integrating user feedback. She’s a big fan of evaluation and using qualitative and quantitative data to help monitor information success (or failure!).

    Over the last two years her work has focussed on targeted resources to help create informed choice and reduce health inequalities.