• 21Dec

    New report highlights health inequalities for people with learning disabilities

    A report launched by NHS Digital and Public Health England highlights differences in health outcomes of people with learning disabilities.

    The report Health and Care of People with Learning Disabilities Experimental Statistics 2014-15 finds that people with learning disabilities have poorer health and shorter life expectancy than those without.

    The report includes data from almost half of all GP practices in England, and identifies differences in the treatment, health status and outcomes of people with learning disabilities compared with the rest of the population.

    The information released today describes the situation at the end of March 2015.

    Findings from the data collected from 2014-15 include:

    •  Females with a learning disability had an 18-year lower life expectancy than the general population, while males with a learning disability had a 14 year lower life expectancy than the general population.
    •  People with learning disabilities were 26 times more likely to have epilepsy, 8 times more likely to have severe mental illness and 5 times more likely to have dementia. They were also 3 times more likely to suffer with hypothyroidism and almost twice as likely to suffer diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease or stroke.
    •  1 in 2 eligible women with a learning disability received breast cancer screening compared to 2 in 3 eligible women without a learning disability.
    • Obesity is twice as common in people aged 18-35 with learning disabilities. Being underweight is twice as common in people aged over 64 with learning disabilities, compared with patients with no learning disabilities

    The report and associated data tables can be accessed on the NHS Digital website.